openforbusinessCoronavirus update: We are seeing patients via videoconsultation where it is clinically appropriate to do so to maximise the patient and staff safety. Enhanced hygiene meaures in our rooms include acrylic screens, masks, hand sanitiser, face shields and physical distancing-related changes. We are closed on Fridays. 

Nurse Beth continues to provide ear molding services face to face on Mondays and Tuesdays. Due to limited appointment availability we are only scheduling ear molding appointments for infants aged less than three months.

There are  currently restrictions on performing elective surgery in Victorian hospitals, as private hospitals are accommodating aged care residents as well as providing nursing staff for aged care residences. We are currently taking bookings for and scheduling emergency and category 1 surgeries at The Avenue and Epworth Freemasons. We are taking bookings for category 2 and 3 surgeries from 21 September, or as soon as the pandemic situation permits. Please note that all patients who are scheduled for elective surgery admission are required to undertake a COVID test and obtain a negative ("not infected") result prior to admission. 

Victorians are in this together and together we will get through this. Thank you for your understanding as our community works through these unprecedented times together (last updated: 10 August 2020).

“Let’s Talk About Fees”

Written by Dr Jill Tomlinson on .

Before you go into hospital for any proposed treatment as a private patient, it’s your right to ask your doctor about his or her fees, and to find out about the fees of other doctors who might be involved in your care.

You should also ask your health fund about what you are covered for, and whether you will have any out-of-pocket costs to pay.

8 questions to ask your doctor about costs before you go to hospital

1.    What are your fees?

Your doctor will talk to you about his or her fees for any proposed treatment, and, if they can, about any out-of-pocket costs that you might have to pay when you go to hospital.

 

 

2.    Are there fees for any other doctors?

Ask your doctor about fees for other doctors, such as the anaesthetist and assistant surgeon. If they can, your doctor will explain the fees of other doctors involved in your care or they will provide you with their contact details so that you can find out about their fees, and about any out-of-pocket costs that you might have to pay.

3.    Will I have any out-of-pocket costs?

If you have to go into hospital for surgical or medical care, there may be an out-of-pocket costs or medical gap that is not covered by Medicare or your private health fund. A medical gap is the difference between the combined amount paid by Medicare and your private health fund for a medical service, and your doctor’s fee.

4.    Is your fee an estimate only?

Remember, your doctor can only estimate the cost of your in-hospital or day surgery elective procedure in advance.

5.    Can I have an estimate of your fees in writing?

Yes. Either your doctor or the doctor’s office staff will provide you with an estimate in writing of the likely cost of your proposed treatment, and if they can, any out-of-pocket costs that you might have to pay.

6.    If the cost changes, when will you let me know?

In an emergency or if something unplanned happens during your procedure, there may be additional costs to you that could not be estimated in advance. This information will be provided to you as soon as possible after treatment occurs.

7.    What if I need a prosthesis?

Prostheses include pacemakers, defibrillators, cardiac stents, joint replacements, intraocular lenses and other devices that are surgically implanted during a stay in hospital. Before surgery, your doctor will tell you if one is required, why you need it and whether it will cost you anything. Most prostheses available won’t cost you anything, but if you have an out-of-pocket cost to pay, your doctor will explain why this prosthesis is the best one for you.

8.    Should I contact my health fund?

Yes. Check with your private health fund to find out what you are covered for and whether your treatment will result in any out-of-pocket costs.

Remember: If you are unclear about the total costs of your treatment… Ask your doctor and your health fund.

For more information on doctors fees and private health insurance, telephone the Private Health Insurance Ombudsman Hotline: 1800 640 695, email them at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., or check out their website at http://www.phio.org.au.

- text from the Australian Medical Association's “Let’s Talk About Fees” brochure

Website Disclaimer

This website is authored by Dr Jillian Tomlinson, a fully qualified plastic, reconstructive and hand surgeon who practices in Melbourne, Australia. This website aims to inform patients and health professionals about hand surgery, illness prevention and the practice philosophy of Dr Jill Tomlinson. This website's content is designed to complement, not replace, the relationship between a patient and his/her own doctor. The information is not intended to replace the advice of a health professional. This website does not host or receive funding from advertising or from the display of commercial content.